Adventist News

WAU Enactus Team Wins First Round

April 1, 2014, the Enactus team at Washington Adventist University in Takoma Park, Maryland, won the first round of a national competition that was part of the Enactus U. S. National Exposition 2014 at Duke Energy Convention Center in Cincinnati, Ohio. The team presented and was judged on a community service project that they developed by applying business concepts.

[Photo: WAU]National Enactus competitions showcase team projects that demonstrate how students are improving the quality of life for people in need through entrepreneurial actions that transform lives. After winning the opening round on April 1, the WAU team lost the quarter final round on April 2 to Belmont University.

Nationwide, there are 518 active Enactus teams with more than 17,000 students working on more than 2,000 community service projects. Last year, U.S. Enactus team participants volunteered more than 541,000 hours of their time. The team that wins the national championship will represent the U.S. at the Enactus World Cup this fall in Beijing, China.

For more information about the WAU Enactus team, contact Professor Kimberly Pichot atkspichot@wau.edu.


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