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God and the Astronomer

New short film adds to increasing collection on faith and science topics.

What does the universe tell us about God?

Robert Jastrow was the founding director of NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies and the first chairman of NASA’s Lunar Exploration Committee. In these and other positions, Jastrow was uniquely placed to understand astronomy and cosmology as the modern scientific understanding emerged. Like many of his generation of scientists, he struggled with the implications of an expanding universe that was created abruptly in the finite past. This and other amazing characteristics of the universe were discovered throughout his career. How does a professed agnostic react to the evidence?

God and the Astronomer is a short film dealing with the implications of what we know about our universe. Jastrow gives his unique perspective on God and astronomy in this gripping film, a perspective that is almost impossible to ignore.

God and the Astronomer is more than fascinating science and mesmerizing philosophy—it is a trip from the Mount Wilson observatory above Los Angeles back to the beginning of the universe. It is also an exploration, not just of matter and space, but of the human mind, logic and faith. Whether or not they are scientists, for many viewers, God and the Astronomer will be among the most fascinating five minutes and forty-five seconds they will ever watch, the film’s creators say. 

The film was released on May 22 by The John 10:10 Project, a vast and growing collection of short films addressing the big questions every Christian faces: Does God Exist? Can the Bible be trusted? Did the resurrection of Jesus really happen? Why is there so much evil, pain and suffering in the world? How does creation reveal a Creator?

Each of the films included in “The John 10:10 Project” is designed to strengthen the faith of Christians and also for sharing with those who are not yet believers, said Timothy Standish, of the Geoscience Research Institute. The John 10:10 Project represents an excellent resource for churches, schools and individuals, explains Standish, one that can be used year around and for special events such as Creation Sabbath, a special annual day of the Seventh-day Adventist Church which focus on God and His creation. In 2018, Creation Sabbath falls on October 27.

“I am thrilled to see how the collection of films is growing at The John 10:10 Project,” said Standish. “God and the Astronomer is a powerful addition to the more than 60 films already available at project website.”

God and the Astronomer director Lad Allen added, “My colleague Jerry Harnad and I have been dedicated to spreading the Gospel through films for more than 40 years. The John 10:10 Project represents a wonderful opportunity for us to share our work and our Christian faith with the world.”

Allen was very clear about the outreach nature of the film. “My hope is that God and the Astronomer is used to strengthen the faith of believers and — possibly most exciting — win the hearts and minds of many to Christ,” he said.


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