READY TO GO: Everett Brown, left, president of the church’s Jamaican Union, said the assistance of the more than 730 congregations will be sought to members of their community. PHOTO: Nigel Coke/IAD

Adventist News

Jamaica: Adventist Church Launches Mega City Campaign

BY NIGEL COKE and Inter-American Division staff

The Seventh-day Adventist Church launched its mega city campaign in Kingston, Jamaica, where thousands of members and commuters were present during the event on January 12, 2014. The campaign, dubbed as “Metro Mission 14 (MM14) – Hope for the City,” is intended to target the largest urban populated region in Jamaica under the initiative “Hope for the Big Cities,” which is part of the world church’s campaign to evangelize the major cities of the world.

Pastor Everett Brown, president of the church in Jamaica, in giving an overview of the MM14, not only in Kingston, but the entire island, emphasized that the assistance of each of the more than 730 congregations will be sought to execute the various projects to reach members of their community. “We seek through this initiative to address the spiritual needs of people in the city of Kingston and in the major urban centers right across Jamaica from Montego Bay in the west to Morant Bay in the east,” said Brown. “We believe that it is our duty as a church to address not only the spiritual needs of people, but to address the social, emotional, and the physical needs of people.”

Pastor Brown indicated that the programs will rely on financial and human resources to get into the communities and touch the lives of individuals.

Forty-seven year-old Vinette Green (in wheel chair) celebrates God’s goodness despite being physically challenged. Green was among thousands of Adventist lay members and commuters who gathered in Half Way Tree Square, Kingston, on January 12, for the launch of Metro Mission 14 (MM14) – Hope for the City.

The areas of focus for MM14 will include meeting the physical needs of individuals by providing clothing, giving medical attention and nutrition education, assisting in resolving family and conflict issues, rehabilitating law offenders, helping marginalized youth, and providing training and academic empowerment.

“We want to reach every person in Kingston,” Brown emphasized. “We want to reach every home and so we are calling upon the members of the church – each one to reach one. No home must be left untouched, no street, city, or town, in Jamaica should be left untouched. We want to turn Jamaica upside down and make it a better place for people to live by sharing Jesus Christ with them.”

In the church’s eastern region, the humanitarian and spiritual mission will assist the most vulnerable in Kingston, St. Andrew, and St. Thomas with more than 100 churches in these three parishes being actively involved.

The launch included Adventist singers from across the region who kept the huge crowd singing, clapping, and praising the Lord.

In giving the charge for the afternoon, Pastor Glen O. Samuels, personal ministries and Sabbath School director for the church in Jamaica, shared biblical analogies of Nicodemus who was told by Jesus that he needed to be born again in order to see the Kingdom of God. “There are some things money can’t give. Nicodemus was told that he needed to be transformed and somebody here needs a new start.”

A call to commitment was made following the charge and scores of persons responded and filled out commitment cards.

For more on the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Jamaica, visit jmunion.org


As the oldest publishing platform of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, the Adventist Review (est. 1849) provides inspiration and information to the global church through a variety of media, including print, websites, apps, and audio and video platforms.Content appearing on any of the Adventist Review platforms has been selected because it is deemed useful to the purposes and mission of the journal to inform, educate, and inspire the denomination it serves.Unless identified as created by “Adventist Review” or a designated member of the Adventist Review staff, content is assumed to express the viewpoints of the author or creator of the content.

We reserve the right to approve and disapprove comments accordingly and will not be able to respond to inquiries regarding that. Please keep all comments respectful and courteous to authors and fellow readers.
comments powered by Disqus